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Bifrost is configured with an ethereum master_public_key, generated for e.g. with this web app https://iancoleman.io/bip39/, by specifying the "BIP32 Extended Public Key".

The question is what would be the steps to follow in order to access the ETH address/wallet, to be able to retrieve the ETH funds?

Thank you.

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By generating a master public key Bifrost is able to derive many public keys / addresses using a single key where users will deposit BTC/ETH. The tool you mentioned will also generate a master private key for you that you can use to derive private keys to corresponding public keys. This is how you can access BTC/ETH deposited by users in account generated using a master public key.

You may also find bifrost check-keys command useful. It will generate a few addresses using your master public key so you can compare if you get the same addresses (and private keys for them) using other tools.

Any tool that supports BIP-32 can be used to generate master keys so you could even use hardware wallets. When you have access to master private key you can generate i-th address and private key for this address.

To find which addresses contain funds:

  1. Check processed_transaction table which contains all transactions that were processed (transactions users submitted to send you money).
  2. Find processed_transaction.receiving_addresses in address_association table (address field). This rows will also contain address_index used to generate private key from master private key (more info in BIP-32).
  • Can you give us an example of which ETH tool/wallet to use (and how), in order to unlock/access the ETH addresses used by bifrost during an ICO? More specifically, how should the master private key be used to access the addresses? Where can we find which ETH addresses were actually used by bifrost? Thank you. – Cristian Gaudi Mar 27 '18 at 7:29
  • Updated my answer. – Bartek Nowotarski Mar 27 '18 at 10:30
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I think you meant if there is a way to access the total balance at once to maybe send all funds to a single destination address. Right?

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