15

Inflation occurs when both of the following conditions occur: Someone (and it can be anyone) sends a transaction with inflation operation. It's time to run inflation. The inflation round is computed as number of weeks since July 1st, 2014. So users can run inflation for the current round and all the previous rounds (if inflation operation was not sent ...


13

Some wallets have the ability to input inflation destination (usually in the settings) If your app does not offer you an option to set the Inflation destination, you can do it manually by using the official Stellar Laboratory. This will work for all wallets, including paper wallet. Go to https://www.stellar.org/laboratory/#?network=public ...


13

This is possible according to the stellar blog: Inflate token supply in a predefined schedule using pre-authorized transactions Issue a dividend In step 1, an issuing account is created. This is the account that can create tokens and send them out. But, notice in the end of the article (step 6) they lock the account, so that the supply is limited. If you ...


11

It depends on when somebody initiates it. From the same page you linked to: Inflation is run in response to an inflation operation that anyone can submit to the network. This operation will fail if the inflation sequence number isn’t one after the last sequence number. It will also fail if (sequence number * 1 week) of time hasn’t elapsed since the ...


11

If you did not want to rely on a 3rd party to gather this data you could run a stellar node and query the postgres database directly. https://github.com/stellar/stellar-core/blob/d6fc518b80afa9731557120f831df06b592db1b0/src/ledger/AccountFrame.cpp#L232 I have used the stellar-core code above to give an idea of the query you would need to run. db....


11

More philosophical than technical. Why is inflation even needed? The reasoning behind inflation lies inside its code. Think of it as a way to recycle the data in such a way to make the ecosystem flow better. Aside from transaction fees being a security feature, the real reasoning was to be like Bitcoin, without the flaws Bitcoin has: 1) Mining is ...


11

A deflationary currency like Bitcoin gives an incentive for hoarding. From an economic perspective, this isn't a good thing, as it decreases the liquidity of the asset and makes it less useful as a currency: nobody will want to spend their bitcoins if they expect their value to increase due to the limited supply alone. Bitcoin's inflation rate is currently ...


7

On Stellar, inflation is calculated as 1% of the total supply plus the total fees charged on the network for transactions during the inflation period. Every week when inflation distribution is made, the total amount distributed is calculated as such: (1% of total supply / 52 weeks) + total fees during week Then that amount is distributed proportionally to ...


7

Based on the Stellar Core inflation operation you can expect to receive at least {your XLM balance} * 0.000190721 every 60 * 60 * 24 * 7 seconds (one week). This however does not include the additional share of that weeks transaction fees. That value however is impossible to know beforehand. More information can be found in the Stellar docs.


7

No. Inflation voting cannot be chained This isn't explicitly mentioned in the documentation so by default you have to fall back to looking at the code for the current implementation. Reading the follow AccountFrame::processForInflation method from the source code: Accounts are selected initially by the following query SELECT sum(balance) AS votes, ...


6

Stellar doesn't have such concept as "cold" wallet. Once your wallet is created and funded, the public key and current balance are recorded on the ledger. If your private key securely stored somewhere (encrypted flash-drive or hardware wallet like Ledger Nano S), you shouldn't worry about the funds. In order to enhance your account security, you can add one ...


6

First of all, you rather need the core db instead of horizon for your query. There is no publicly available core DB and I doubt that ever will be, due to unpredictable loading and security implications. You have to set up your own Stellar Core node. It doesn't need to be a validator node. That way you'll have access to the relevant and 100% genuine network ...


6

Given the current set of tools in our ecosystem (and lack of analytical systems) the easiest way to programatically determine when the last inflation was distributed is using Horizon server. You can do it two ways: If you want to be notified when inflation is executed you can stream all the operations and call a function when operation type is equal to ...


5

Yes. Let's assume that you already have an issuing account (I) and distribution account (D) and you've issued 1,000,000 CANDYs. Let's see how a transaction that generates 2% of new tokens after 1st year looks like: Send inflation after 1st year: Source account: I Sequence number: current + 1 Min time: now + 1 year Operations: Payment: 2% (inflation rate) *...


5

Just create a paper wallet (paper, pendrive, ledger nano, etc), add some funds, set inflation destination and that's it. Even if you don't touch your account for years inflation will get to the ledger and increase your balance. function setInflation(secretKey, destination, memo='Inflation') { var serverUrl = 'https://horizon.stellar.org'; var server ...


5

Quoting the Lumenaut.org pool website: Inflation is a nominal mechanism which distributes new Lumens, on a weekly basis and at a rate of 1% per year to the holders. The inflation is distributed using a voting system, if yout address does not have the minimum requirements of 0.05% of the votes, then you can still achieve it by joining a pool. The pool is ...


4

You can use fed.netwok's inflation public API endpoint to get the list of accounts that has voted for an inflation destination. In your case the URL would be: https://fed.network/inflation/GCCD6AJOYZCUAQLX32ZJF2MKFFAUJ53PVCFQI3RHWKL3V47QYE2BNAUT


4

Pre-authorized transactions come with their own signing weights, so as long as they pass the medium threshold you're good to go. You do need to set them up before locking down the account though, so that limits you.


4

Inflation occurs when somebody (anybody) transacts the Inflation Operation and it has been at least 1 week since the last successful Inflation Operation. The calculations are performed at that time. The inflation pool is (number of lumens in existence)*(weekly inflation rate) + fee pool This amount is shared pro-rata amongst all accounts which meet the ...


3

Unallocated inflation lumens are returned to the fee pool.


3

The inflation operation can be run from any valid wallet on the network. It's simply an operation to check if it is time for the inflation votes to be tallied. If the operation returns that it is time for inflation payouts it will trigger an inflation event for the whole network. This ensures that the inflation is run in a decentralized manner


3

12am UTC on Tuesdays every week. The other answers tell you how it works, but I felt it necessary to answer the actual question, of "What day of the week" by actually looking historically. To properly answer your question, I had to do some digging in my related question: How can I determine when the last inflation was distributed? I've gone back multiple ...


2

As a complementary to @Rubber Ducky's and @jehna1's excellent answers, I'll add some existing external tutorials which I think are more user friendly. Set Up Your Lumen Inflation by Lumenaunts. it's essentially the same as @Rubber Ducky's answer however with some screenshots. This site also provides a couple of other nice tutorials for beginners. With ...


2

You can also use the Stellar Horizon API to set your inflation destination yourself (without using a wallet app). You need to create a new Operation and set options your operation to change the inflation destination that points to the wanted inflation destination. Here's an example code in JavaScript (from my own project): async function voteFor(target, ...


2

There is no on-ledger method of creating this at this time. The features of "fees" and "inflation" are currently reserved exclusively for XLM. There is also no native system to host or describe this 'rate' and submit txns for you. The mechanism and code to create and submit these transactions must be from provided outside of the Stellar infrastructure at ...


2

In order to get the historical inflation votes data you need to run a Horizon node with CATCHUP_COMPLETE parameter set to true. Once a fully synced instance is ready, you will be able to query history_effects table which contains all ledger effects. Inflation destination is set by SET_OPTIONS operation that yields SIGNER_UPDATED effect despite the fact ...


2

Total number of all XLM is not a constant. Every week the built-in inflation mechanism distributes new lumens. You can find detailed information here.


2

The primary function of XLM is to be the common base currency of asset exchange. This is evident in the fact that it is the only asset for which no trustline is required. With a common base currency, the quantity of order books needed to fulfil any payment path is reduced significantly, which is good for liquidity on the network. I believe that the network ...


1

Q1 & Q3 are similar better refer to this answer "you should run your own node if you created some service relying over stellar network" For instance, if you are relying on an external Horizon and once it is hacked or down, your service could be doomed. You have better control over your own Stellar node. Q2 Yes, and you may find out more about ...


1

stellar-core has few under documented (not mentioned in the documentation but mentioned in the help page of the binary) command line parameters. One of them called --cathup-at which does exactly what we wanted: From a new database (use --newdb first), it "jumps" to a given ledger number without "joining to SCP" and then exits. After this, one can query the ...


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