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12

Yes, it should be possible but I'm not aware of any tool/library that implements it. Thet idea is that you send a message of type GET_PEERS to a known stellar core instance, which in turn will reply with a PEERS message. Before being able to send the message you need to authenticate with the peer. By looking at the source, the connection process is as ...


9

On Google's cloud servers they managed 36,000,000 transactions per second hour. Visa handles 24,000. So as far as time goes I suspect it will take the same amount of time as it does now unless it gets way way bigger than Visa. Even then there are likely still ways it can be better optimized but we haven't gotten to the point where it's a concern. The fee is ...


7

As a non-profit they are bound by law to have no part of the net income or assets benefit any member of the corporation or private person. I'm not sure how this exactly works with pay but I think their pay is regulated by the IRS. Sources: https://www.stellar.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/FILED-STELLAR-DEVELOPMENT-FOUNDATION-00594674.pdf https://www....


7

The developer guide has a link to a Medium post that details how it works using a lunch analogy that does it's best to explain this quite complicated topic. You can read it in full here https://medium.com/a-stellar-journey/on-worldwide-consensus-359e9eb3e949 The ELI5 version is that the individual nodes rely on peer pressure from trusted nodes to come to a ...


6

TL;DR: only expose port 11625 on stellar-core. Stellar Core Port 11625 Port 11625 of stellar-core must be exposed outside your network to allow it to communicate with peers. The stellar-core configuration file has a KNOWN_PEERS field which specifies the IPs and domains that your stellar-core node will try to connect to. This is how your node will register ...


5

It depends what you want to do with those peers: if you're looking at ip+port addresses, you can simply get a list of known peers on the network by just leaving a stellar-core running for a while. This will build a list of peers in its "peers" table (an instance only connects to a small subset of that list). For this particular scenario you don't need to re-...


4

There are HTTP commands that can be issued directly to core. For example: /tx?blob=Base64 submit a transaction to the network. See https://www.stellar.org/developers/stellar-core/software/commands.html


4

The network passphrase hash is a component of the transaction hash data that is signed (example from the Java SDK). This means that transactions in one network are invalid in other networks.


4

I'd said that such behavior is rather a bug. Confirmed on both, public and test networks. Definitely should be reported here.


3

If you run an instance of stellar core you can query the database. There are no actual endpoints of Horizon that enable you to query like that.


3

Nodes rely on the fact that SCP messages are broadcasted to all peers on the network (for the most part); the number of peer to peer connections just increases the chances that the network as a whole is strongly connected (it's mostly randomly connected) which in turn pretty much guarantees that messages eventually reach all peers on the network. Note that ...


3

Horizon server talks to Stellar core, and anyone can host stellar core and Horizon server. There are many core servers running they are like nodes on Stellar network, so there is no single point of failure. You can always host your own Stellar core and Horizon for a good network support and a better uptime for your dapp. You can see the network states, nodes ...


3

Each node defines which other ones it trusts for the quorum. The layers are a good example for a model how to organise whom to trust. But on the technical side there are just node addresses and thresholds defined. When you want to add a new node to your "layer", you would need to add it to the QUORUM_SET in Core config.


3

If you're running stellar-core take a look at list of commands available https://github.com/stellar/stellar-core/blob/master/docs/software/commands.md This command shows you overview of quorum for any node stellar-core -c 'quorum' stellar-core -c 'quorum?node=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' And this command gives you some info about all nodes ...


2

Just for anyone else having the same trouble - I was using a template with some old/expired validators in it. You can get other examples from the docs and from dashboard.stellar.org. Setting up for the first time can be tricky. This was a noob question. But the next will be less noob :)


2

I've tracked down the reason for this. The following is taken from the description for the 0.8.0 SDK release: "Configure network at the transaction and server level rather than using a singleton to determine which network to use globally." For server level, we already have this in place: Server server = new Server("https://horizon.stellar.org"); At the ...


2

Responded on Reddit but will respond here as well. OrbitLens is also working on a sidechain called Project Centaurus. Project Centaurus is the second layer payment network, exchange, and scaling solution for Stellar. It's a platform with very high throughput that allows a few independent organizations to create a protected decentralized segment on ...


1

Dunno if that's helpful, here's something I wrote 1.5 years ago https://galactictalk.org/d/230-history-of-stellar-as-i-remember-it


1

You can find some information on current storage size here. As for the growth rate, nobody can predict how much transactions per second we can expect even in the next month. Number of accounts metric demonstrate steady growth.


1

As an administrator of a validator, you must ensure that the maintenance you are about to take on is safe for the overall network and for your validator. Safe means that the other validators that depend on yours will not be affected too much when you turn off your validator for maintenance and that your validator will continue to operate as part of the ...


1

Throughput is 1000 transactions per second. If the network load was demanding 2000 transactions in a second then it would take 2 seconds to fulfill that need. If that need was maintained for 4 hours, then how long does it take the last transaction at the 4th hour to process? I think this is the type of question this is asking. I will try to answer: At the ...


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