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Tl;dr: Stellar’s protocol (SCP) uses a decentralized state propagation where each node commits to a value if every node it deems trustworthy agrees while Ripple uses a supermajority vote (80%) among all validating nodes. Stellar achieves better decentralization than Ripple. A pretty old, but still relevant discussion on the bitcoin stack exchange Stellar ...


7

Stellar transactions are non-reversible. A solution to prevent fraud when buying a physical product is to use multi-signature and have both the buyer and the seller agree on an impartial mediator. The principle is the same as Bitcoin 2-of-3 multisig transactions. The developer documentation has an example on how to set up a multisig accounts on the Stellar ...


7

Skip list are designed to speed up ledger chain validation as they allow to jump in the chain by up to 500000 ledgers (that's about a month worth of ledgers). Use case is that even from thin client you can verify that a ledger that you are observing is indeed connected to genesis (going back from that ledger) and/or connected to the latest ledger from ...


4

As a practical matter, SCP's asymptotic security follows from the fact that it depends only on digital signatures (and hash functions) for security, and that these can be tuned to resist arbitrarily powerful attackers. For example, you consider an attack in which every grain of sand on earth is a supercomputer attempting to break SCP a billion times per ...


4

You can read the network configuration section in the admin guide. Here is the relevant snippet: For a new value to be adopted, the same level of consensus between nodes needs to be reached as for transaction sets. What that means is that the mechanism (consensus) to get the network to agree to a change is the same one than for deciding which transaction ...


3

Attachments are sent outside of the ledger using Compliance Protocol. The sha-256 hash of the attachment is part of a transaction to identify a previously sent attachment when a transaction is received. route parameter contains the actual memo value returned by Federation server. Normally (for transactions that do not use Compliance Protocol) the memo ...


3

You're mixing up two completely different concepts here. One is about transaction finality, and the other is about resistance to sybil attacks. POW has probabilistic finality, since there's always the potential of a longer chain reverting your transaction. SCP has deterministic finality -- when a transaction is included in a ledger update, that's it. No ...


3

I think the date that you used is in the future 1534550400 = Saturday, August 18, 2018 12:00:00 AM. if you want it to happen right away, just use the epoch as per the documentation it's 1970-01-01T00:00:00Z


3

First, note that the values in stellar are actually sets of transactions, or actually triples with a set of transactions, a timestamp, and a list of upgrades. Second, it's a little hard to follow your example because you didn't specify what the quorum slices were, so I'm going to answer your higher-level questions. Can someone also clarify for me what ...


3

This is by analogy with symmetric Byzantine agreement protocols (in which everyone has the same quorum slices). You need any two quorums to intersect at an honest node. If your threshold is 2/3 or lower then you need to proceed when 1/3 of nodes have failed. But if you divide nodes into three equal-sized groups A, B, and M, and M is bad, then A+M and B+M ...


2

Responded on Reddit but will respond here as well. OrbitLens is also working on a sidechain called Project Centaurus. Project Centaurus is the second layer payment network, exchange, and scaling solution for Stellar. It's a platform with very high throughput that allows a few independent organizations to create a protected decentralized segment on ...


1

A node can only be befouled if there exists an ill-behaved node befouling the node. This is only true if you have nominal quorum intersection. That's why so many of the theorems say "assume an FBAS with quorum intersection." More recent expositions of the protocol such as the recent SOSP paper get around this problem by defining a quorum as a set ...


1

1) Setup three stellar-core nodes and configure them in a way that you have your own network passphrase each node writes their own archive each node can read the other nodes archives they include each other in their quorum sets have each other in their known peers Kickstart your network by restarting one node with the force-scp option. 2) Get as many ...


1

A ledger may contain up to 50 transactions (parameter max_tx_set_size in ledger details). This value is not a constant, it is determined by the current protocol version, and may be changed by validators voting in the nearest future. Each transaction may contain up to 100 operations. You don't need to worry about ledger sequence, operation identifiers, etc. ...


1

There is https://www.stellar.org/stories/adventures-in-galactic-consensus-chapter-1/, which is a quite nice, as they say, graphic novel. For people who like to think of themselves as very serious, there's this writeup: https://medium.com/a-stellar-journey/on-worldwide-consensus-359e9eb3e949, which also does the job of explaning the protocol basics.


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